Tips and Tricks, writing

Quick Tip #10

Video game music and soundtracks have some epic instrumental music that is also meant to be motivational. Listen to that to get you in the writing mood.

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WordSmith Musings, writing

10 Classic Novels to Read in 2020

1.Pride and Prejudice

For anyone who has ever felt awkward in love, there is character you will relate to. This witty, charming, and flirty book will have you laughing from the first chapter! This is maybe my favorite classic of all time!

 

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee weaves a harrowing tale of racial discrimination and the law set from the eyes of a spunky child. Scout’s adventures are as entertaining as they are poignant. 

 

3. 1984

This novel is not for the faint of heart. This book was written in 1949 predicting what a terrifying 1984 could look like if we weren’t careful. Big Brother is always watching and they decide everything, even down to what you think. This book will make you think about censorship, control, and liberty in a whole new light. 

 

  1. White Fang

Follow the tale of a lonely wolfdog, we see the harsh life of the North, cruel people who only know how to mistreat, and kindness that can win the darkest heart. I highly recommend. 

 

5. Jane Eyre

Looking for a mystery wrapped up in a romance? Or maybe a heroine every girl can relate to? Jane is a very plain woman and, despite the harshness of those around her, grows into a kind woman. She begins to work for Mr. Rochester and the mystery of his past and their future will keep you on your toes!

 

  1. Frankenstein

Dr. Frankenstein heads down a dark path as he begins to explore the darker sides of science. His monster thread of the story will have you questioning what the term ‘monster’ really means. Intriguing and gothic, this novel will have you up for hours to finish. 

 

7. Great Expectations

Pip’s struggle from poverty to riches and the complications from pretty girls, criminals, and old, creepy women make for a rich tale. Dickens certainly know how to create vibrant characters and this novel is littered with them.

 

 

  1. The Horse and His Boy

A powerful tale of a young impoverished boy and a Talking Horse escaping dreary lives of slavery to reach Narnia and freedom. This epic within the Chronicles of Narnia is a great read whether you’ve read the rest or not!

 

9. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Join Huck on his adventures doing the Mississippi River with Jim, a slave seeking freedom. From ridiculous boyhood adventures to moving moments, this book is a great American classic. 

 

 

  1. Midsummer’s Night Dream

Shakespeare of course makes the list. Midsummer’s Night Dream is a fanciful and entertaining tale of two worlds colliding; the human and the fey. With love stories all amiss and shenanigans ensuing, no one will be the same after this night!

 

 

 

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Book Review, WordSmith Musings, writing

Whatcha reading? Narnia edition

This month I’ve dove back into the classic Narnia series. I read them when I was about 12 or so and really enjoyed them. At the start of the New Year, I was trying to figure out what to read next (a daunting question as I stare at the numerous books on my shelves that I’ve bought over the years).

Image result for narnia

The Chronicles of Narnia caught my attention. I had watched the movies recently and so I knew a few of them well. And I had read the Magician’s Nephew for a class. But The Silver Chair, The Last Battle? It had been years and I honestly couldn’t really remember what happened!

So I began in the original order they were published. I read The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. Then came Prince Caspian. Next was Voyage of the Dawn Treader. After that was The Silver Chair. And I’m just now finishing up the Horse and His Boy.

The Horse and His Boy is one of my all time favorites. It details the adventure of a young boy and a Talking Horse escaping a life of hardships to find freedom in Narnia. There’s adventures and excitement and some of my favorite characters pop back up from the other books. But what I think strikes me so much is how much we can see Aslan working in this boy’s life and, until the end, he has no clue. This idea resonated with me.

I also find the story of an orphan nobody who discovers that he is loved and has a great family is heartwarming and feel-good. Plus, the villians are harrowing, the heroes relatable, and the story just plain fun.

I highly recommend all of the Chronicles of Narnia, but definitely the Horse and His Boy!

What are you reading right now? Any recommendations for my next book? Put it in the comments below!

Affiliate links have been included in this post. This means if you purchase a book with the link provided, I may receive a small payment. If you have any questions regarding this policy, please reach out to me on my contact page.

Tips and Tricks, writing

Quick Tip #9

If you need to re-read your story to remember exactly what has happened, don’t re-read more than three to five pages. Instead, try to write descriptive headings for your chapters or section breaks (you can make them clever later). Read the headings and don’t get sucked into your own story or the desire to edit what you’ve already done. Just keep plugging on.

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