Tips and Tricks, WordSmith Musings, writing

World Building Made Easy: Notebook AI Review

Today I’m reviewing Notebook AI, a world building site for writers, RPG players, and anyone else interested in creating a world.

Maybe some of you have heard of Notebook AI. If you haven’t, let me tell you more. (If you have, skip to the next paragraph for my review). Notebook AI is a website that allows you to create a world and detail it out there to keep everything organized. You are able to create individual universes, in which can live a myriad of different things. In the free version, you can add unlimited characters, including their look, nature, socialness, history, family, inventory, pictures, and notes. You can add unlimited locations and unlimited Items, all with a large list of descriptors to help you visualize and categorize these parts of your story. The premium version adds in other categories such as creatures, jobs, governments, magics, and other helpful world building tools. On top of that, you can write within the program or add documents. In the premium version, they are also working on an AI that analyzes your writing for readability, clarity, and themes.

Now, you may wonder if Notebook AI is worth it. In my opinion, YES!

PSA: The links I have included have a referral code (aka if you sign-up, I might get a small profit), but honestly, whether or not you click that or type it into google, I highly recommend this program. Seriously, if you have qualms about referrals, check it out yourself and sign up for the free version. I recommend this on its merits alone.  Read below for the pros AND the cons of it. (I like to try to see both sides).

I began with the free version months ago and I felt like I got a chance to learn about my characters more in depth. They have numerous promptings under each category and I feel like I gained the ability to create a much more rounded character. And one that I can remember later while I’m writing. For a long time, I had a word document with each character listed out and a long blob of text to describe them. Every time I needed a small detail, I’d stop and read for five minutes, completely interrupting my flow. This fleshes it out and makes the information easy to access.

The ease of access is the second reason I would recommend it. It is organized well. You can get to each of your characters, locations, etc easily, it’s user friendly, and it encourages you to keep adding things from the home page. It has been phenomenal having everything in one place where I can quickly jump to. “What color was his hair?” “Was that scar on the right cheek or the left?” “Did that pommel have rubies or sapphires?” I have those answers and I didn’t spend twenty minutes searching my story  to get them.

Another great feature, which I mentioned above in my description, is the writing portion. You can upload documents and write on them right in the program. And for premium users, you’re able to have an AI analyze it for you. I learned how many times each character’s name appeared, who the story seemed to focus on, the themes it could see. And this is still being tested so it isn’t perfect but it gave me a good outside perspective of my story that I sometimes have a hard time getting elsewhere. Who else is going to tell me that the current emotion felt most often by my characters is sadness? It also let me know the readability of my story by age range which was helpful to gauge my audience when I begin to look towards publishing.

Finally, in the same writing section is a feature called ‘prompts’. You can go to that and it’ll just prompt you to answer more questions about the world you’ve already built. “Who was Amel’s father?” “What year was Callaway City founded?” These things that you may not have had an answer to right when you created it but you can now think about and create. It’s a really fun way to spend an hour, just beefing up your story. (For me, it tends to be a killer way to get past writer’s block while staying in the story).

As with every program, this one isn’t perfect though. There are a few flaws that I’ve noticed and I don’t want you to go in blind. First, creating multiple universes is easy (five in free version and unlimited in premium) but it can sometimes get confusing. Each character, location, item, etc is tagged with a certain universe. But when you go look at the ‘Character’ sheet, it doesn’t automatically sort that out for you.  Each section helpfully allows you to search by universe and other tags. But you have to choose to sort or otherwise you just get one long list of every character in every universe. A few of my characters have accidentally made jumps from one to another because I wasn’t paying enough attention.

Second, some of the really cool features are premium features. The extra world building pages (creatures was the one I really wanted) are all premium. Free does give you unlimited characters, locations, and items, which sustained me for many months and through a lot of short stories. But I finally did have to bite the bullet and go to premium for the extra content. The AI function is also a premium feature which wasn’t really in my original consideration, but I have loved since discovering.

The plus side of premium is that it is only between $7-$9 a month (depending on if you’re billed monthly or yearly). Seriously, you can skip two lattes a month and be able to enhance your worlds. Completely worth it to me (and I really love lattes).

So, to sum everything up, I recommend Notebook AI. It is a helpful tool for writers to assist as you build, maintain, and add vibrancy to your stories. It has been revolutionary in my writing!

Sign up here if you’re ready to try out Notebook AI for yourself.

If I missed any pros or cons, please let me know. Again, the links are referrals for me (so if you like this review, I would ask you use them) but if they throw you off at all, check it out for yourself and enjoy the more vibrant world you’ll get because of it!

Thanks!

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Sunday Story Segment, writing

Asena Ch. 11: Information

Hello dear readers. It’s been a while since we’ve dived into Asena’s life. Here’s a quick recap of the first ten chapters. After discovering Francis, the thief who stole from Marlene, dead at his hotel, Marlene proves that she has great observational skills and deduces it was murder. With a solid lead that someone with access to a deadly form of a drug was involved, they hatched a risky plan to pose as buyers, putting Marlene’s money, and possibly life, at risk. Asena, terrified of someone getting hurt and worried that she has lost control of her operation, searches for other ways to find out the info they so desperately need. 

 

 

Danny had been completely understanding when I had asked to see Bernie before he was released. I felt a twinge of guilt as I descended the cold concrete steps in the police station. During pizza, I had caved and told him that I didn’t think Francis’ death was an accident. He wasn’t surprised since that seemed to be where the investigation was leading and he had felt bad for not letting me know sooner. 

“I just figured I’d give you a day or two of relative safety before you start poking your nose around,” he had answered with a sheepish grin. 

If only Marlene hadn’t been so curious. But that smile, his concern for me that literally radiated out of his actions, forced my mouth closed. I couldn’t tell him about Emmett and our incredibly risky plan. And because of that, I couldn’t explain exactly why I needed to talk to the criminal in his jail cell. 

So I had told him that Bernie had talked about  my father and that it had been nagging me. He had been in town and didn’t see me or try to reach out or anything. I wanted to know why he had come back. 

I felt a little better, knowing that it wasn’t a lie. I did want to know, but I never would have stood to be near Bernie again if it didn’t keep Emmett and Marlene out of danger. 

The jail cells were nearly empty, one person in the first one dozing on the bed in a pair of slacks and a dress shirt. I kept walking till I hit the last cell where Bernie sat, reading a book. He looked up at the sound of footsteps and his eyes widened.

“What the hell are you doing here?” His eyes were clear and despite having been in jail since the fight, he looked much cleaner and more put together. 

“Hi Bernie,” I replied, my mouth quirking. 

“You shouldn’t be here,” he said, closing his book. 

“I’ve come for some information,” I said, leaning close. I tried to stay relaxed, arms open and my breathing steady. 

“Information?” He laughed loudly, echoing off the walls. “What kind of information? Where the best cupcakes are in town?” His condescending voice ate at me and I took another steadying breath so I didn’t lash out. 

“I need info about something a little more sensitive,” I replied. “Like where you would find a pure form of cocaine.”

His eyes widened and his forehead wrinkled, causing the dirt from the past nights to crease. 

“Damn, you really are following in your father’s footsteps,” he replied, whistling. “And why would you think I’d know where you can find that?”

“Because I know that the police believe you to be in contact with pretty much every drug runner in the area. You are very influential when it comes to this kind of thing, apparently.”

He grinned, sitting up a little straighter. “Well, that’s flattering. But if I knew anything, do you really think I’d talk to the little girl who tazed me when I was drunk and who’s daddy ripped me off?”

“C’mon,” I cajoled. “This is business. Don’t drag the personal in.”

“Business?” Bernie’s nostrils flared as he raised his voice. “Your father screwed me over in business. Don’t think you’re getting any help from me.” He shook his head, crossing his arms as leaned back.

“My father didn’t screw you over,” I answered slowly. If I didn’t play this well, I could be in a serious amount of trouble. “But I know he could. And I can too, if you force me.”

“What are you talking about?” he asked, his eyes slits.

“He always does the same thing, each con,” I replied. I slipped a CD out of my purse, holding it up for him to see. “It’s why you never ratted him out. Mutually assured destruction.”

Bernie looked pale as he stared at the CD.

“How did you get that?”

“Dad always left a copy in our safe deposit box,” I answered, slipping it back in my purse. His eyes watched it hungrily and he stood up, his legs ready to pounce if I gave him the chance. 

“You can’t give that to the cops,” he said, shaking his head as if to dispel the notion physically. “Your old man is on there as much as me.”

“Yes,”I said, as if I was thinking it over. “But in case you didn’t notice, we don’t get along very well. A stint in prison could be good for him. Maybe straighten him out.”

“Liar,” he breathed. “You’d never send your father to jail.” He clenched the bars, now only a few feet from me. I took a step back, just in case he did decide to lunge.

“I know what’s on this video. You scammed a poor, old woman out of so much money. You are both scum and I would happily turn you in. People who do terrible things like this deserve to be in jail,” I spat. My fists were clenched and I leaned back quickly, realizing I was within grabbing distance from the bars. 

Thankfully, my outburst had caused Bernie to back up. His fingers were fidgeting with his shirt and his eyes kept darting from me to my purse.

“If I tell you, you’ll destroy that and all other copies?” he asked. He scratched his face.

“No,” I retorted. “Do you think I’m stupid? I know the people you deal with, I wouldn’t make it out of the parking lot. No, I will not turn in the video. Though there is someone who has a copy, and if I ever go missing or something unfortunate occurs, this will go out. Plus, Harold would kill you.”

He rubbed his arm and his chest heaved as he thought about it. “What did you need to know?”

“Who has the ability to sell a pure form of cocaine? Something that could cause an overdose from one usage?”

“An OD with one use?” He scratched his chin, staring far away at a corner of the cell. “ I mean, there could be lots of sources.”

“Narrow it down. C’mon, who do you think would make a sell like that?”

“Calm down, girl, give me a second.” I huffed my impatience, happy to see a small smirk lift his lip. He liked being able to annoy me.

“Wilson Helston works off from Ninth and Praline, he could do something like that,” he mused. “Or maybe Henry Fauston. Actually,” he drug out the word and I sighed again for good measure. “Jeffery Mugson, he’s got a good connection with his suppliers, he’d be able to find some very discreetly. If I needed something done like that, I’d go to him.”

“Thank you,” I said. “Now, I don’t want us to be hostile, even if you did try to ransom me back to my father. I’m not the kind of person to hold something like this over you. Please don’t see me as your enemy.” 

He spat out some laughter and shook his head.

“What you’re doing, girl, that’s called blackmail. I may not be your enemy, but that is a sure-fire way to make them. Be careful, those drug dealers aren’t as kind and sweet as me.”

I smirked back at him. “Last time we met, you got tasered and I walked away. Trust me, I can take care of myself.”

He let out a chuckle. “You’re bold, I’ll give you that. Definitely Harold’s brat. But if I get one word that that disk has been seen by the cops, I’m going to be much less friendly. You got that?”

I stared him down, my fists curling. “I keep my word, Bernie. I am not Harold.”

“No,” he said, shaking his head with a half smile. “You aren’t. But you could do well to be a bit more like him if you’re getting into this world.”